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Alright, let's see what we have today, first up, this amazing ad from Guinness:

Also in the world of advertising, this guy spend over $1,000 on Twitter ads because an airline lost his luggage and he wanted them to actually do their job.

The KKK, which is sadly still a thing, had their first-ever meeting with the NAACP, and it was described as "peaceful."

A new study shows that gun ownership, not suicidal behavior, is actually the highest indicator of suicide.

Hahaha, amazing chart of things said to designers.

So this exists:

Russia is now moving towards forcibly taking children away from LGBT parents.  At the end of the G-20 summit, when Obama met with Activists, they begged him to help get them out of the country.  Things are only going to get worse as we head towards the Olympics.

Utah follows in Florida's idiotic footsteps.  Again, for those keeping score: those on public assistance are far less likely than the general public to be on drugs, stop wasting money.

And finally, a great idea for a public service campaign:

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Alright, let's see what we have today.  Lots of political news, so fair warning.

Oh, the irony of the NRA creating the database they've been screaming about for years.  Oh, the irony.

Rick Perry: Vocally hates Obamacare, quietly asks for $100 million benefit from it.  You know, because he hates it.  So much.

I could probably talk about this over at the King of Spades, but as it turns out, schools with anti-homophobia policies are safer...for all their students.  Amazing.

But then again, according to Justice Scalia, we're an "invented" minority, and thus don't deserve equal rights..  I wonder when I first came into being?

And here's the three articles that make me furious.  An Iraq vet was booed at a city council meeting...because he's gay.

A church in Tennessee kicks out a family...for supporting their daughter, who just happens to be a lesbian.

And lastly, an interracial couple gets assaulted, and has homophobic slurs thrown at them (they had been out with a gay friend), in New York City, which has this rash of homophobic attacks lately.

Well, this has been a depressing post.  In happier news, I'm heading to a reading of "The Birdcage" tomorrow as a fundraiser for the Zoo (the flamingo enclosure, specifically), and this Saturday is the City of Play Festival.  Come downtown to play some new games and run around downtown, it will be fun!  And if the games aren't fun, we'll make it fun!

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Alright, let's see what we have today.  First up, the Patton Oswalt Star Wars filibuster (all from his head by the way, not scripted) has been animated:

As the debate about voter ID laws continue, here's some startling facts:

Between 2000 and 2010 there were 649 million votes cast in general elections; 47,000 UFO sightings; 441 Americans killed by lightning; and 13 credible cases of in-person voter impersonation.

So this is really, really scary: a child has burst into flames...four times!  And to be fair, he would more likely be part of the FF (Fantastic Four/Future Force, whatever they're called at the moment).

Awesome music video from Mumford and Sons...and fiends:

A federal court has struck down a bigoted anti-Islamic law in Oklahoma.  It's really nice to see that, as there has been a rash of hatred in the south (and the west) and it all seems so knee-jerk racism with no grounds in reality.

Good news, the American Bar Association is pushing a ban on using the "gay panic" defense.  Nice to see that making its way forward as well.

This is a bit sadistic, but fun to watch.  Turn on the English closed captions to know what's going on:

That's it for today, have a great one!

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Alright, let's see what we have today.  First up, Sweden's recycling programs are so good, they've run out of trash.

Are you allergic to cats, but your significant other loves them?  Science may be able to save your relationship.

A teaser for the new season of American Horror Story:

I've tried to explain it before, but the Good Men Project does a great job talking about the concept of "family of choice."

I have a different story to link to about Pope Francis' comments, but a great follow up from the head of the HRC can be found here.

That's it for now, short update.  Have a great one!

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Alright, let's see what we have today.  First up, the new trailer for Kick Ass 2 (NSFW):

A Firefly MMO has been announced, although it appears to be exclusively for mobile phones.  Will be interesting to see what it's like, but it may be too late. 

A great ad campaign which uses national flags.  Very well done.

A mash-up I didn't expect to see:

John Williams has come on board to score Star Wars: Episode VII.

What if the Internet was laid out like a galaxy?  Check it out here.

It has some strong language (deservedly so), but the best response yet to Orson Scott Card comes from Harvey Fierstein.

Can Richard Simmons stay still for 60 seconds?

The new trailer for the next Hunger Games movies is here.

I was never into the boy bands the first time around, but I kind of like this song, maybe it's a weird reverse nostalgia thing:

Amazing "get well soon" wishes....to roadkill.

The best (or worse) drinking game ever?

Okay, one more video, this amazing thing happened:

That's it for now, have a great one!

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Alright, let's see what we have going on today.

First up, need a pick-me up?  Watch this crazy video.  Sometimes I really miss soap operas.

Or just watch this:

Just remember, the separation of Church and State is only applicable if it's what you want.  Or something like that.

I never thought of it this way, but second amendment extremists have met their match: insurance companies.

Whoever is running the social media accounts at JCPenny is awesome:

As a reminder, Orson Scott Card, the writer of Ender's Game, is a hateful bigot.  Like, he has said that he thinks members of the LGBT community should be rounded up arrested and put in camps.  But now, he wants us to forget about that, so he can make money on his new movie.  Needless to say, the responses have been epic, and I won't be seeing the movie.

And this is what happens when capitalism goes unchecked:

There is a cool documentary coming out about Walt Disney trying to secure the rights to Mary Poppins, and it looks amazing. Also, Tom Hanks looks exactly like Walt Disney himself.  Check it out here.

Wolverine: the puppet musical.  So that's a thing.

And lastly, the trailer for The Fifth Estate, the movie about WikiLeaks.  It looks good, but I think all the good parts may be in the trailer:

That's it for now, have a great one!

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Alright, let's see what I have going on today.  First up, before the Windsor and Perry rulings by SCOTUS, the Voting Rights Act was gutted.  Justice Ginsberg summed it up well:

A 4,000 year old Egyptian statue started rotating in its case in a British museum.  Creepy.

Also in the news, was Wendy Davis, who, with the help of other Democrats and the citizens of Texas, filibustered an anti-choice bill in Texas.  And while I think that so many of the "three strikes" used to stop her filibuster were Republicans stretching the rules, they still (generally) played by the rules, except for not voting on the third and then trying to change the congressional record to show they voted before midnight.  But my favorite moment of the night was the fifteen minutes of the citizens screaming nonstop to stop the bill.  Check out Slog's coverage here.

A great ad via Norway (it's okay if you only speak English):

 

The ad campaign from Italy for their alzheimer's foundation, brilliant and moving

And what is being called the best coupon in history.  If I wasn't lactose-intolerant, I would agree.

A few more follow-ups from the DOMA and Prop 8 cases.  YouTube put together their #ProudToLove campaign:

Dan Savage hits it out of the park with a few articles.  First up, "I Can Die Now," which gets to the heart of why the Windsor case was so important, and what people take for granted.

Conservative Christians and their "cheeseburger" moment, and no, it doesn't include cat memes.

And while they didn't lose a single thing, we can celebrate what we've won, including a man, thirty minutes after the rulings came out that was saved from being deported:

At 10:30 a.m. EDT this morning in a New York Immigration Court, attorneys from our law firm (Masliah Soloway) requested and were granted a continuance in removal (deportation) proceedings for a Colombian gay man married to an American citizen for whom we had filed a marriage-based green card petition last year. A copy of the 77-page Supreme Court decision in United States v. Windsor was delivered to the court by our summer intern, Gabe, who ran five blocks and made it in time for the decision to be submitted to the Immigration Judge and to serve a copy on the Immigration & Customs Enforcement Assistant Chief Counsel. DOMA is DEAD and it had its first impact on a binational couple within 30 minutes of the Supreme Court ruling.

The horrific nature of Justice Scalia and his son, who doesn't think homosexuals even exist.

And of course, if you haven't heard yet, Brian Sims, who was trying to speak on the Pa. House floor about the rulings, was silenced by the representative from Cranberry.  He's garnered national attention for "speaking against God's will" as the bigot from Cranberry said.  He keeps pushing for a non-discrimination ordinance and marriage equality, we'll see how far he can get.

Garfunkle and Oates are back with "The Loophole."  Sadly, this is a real thing, and they are of course, pointing out the absurdity of it.  Not at all safe for work, or for easily offended eyes.  But wroth it if you get to the end to see the list of other rules they ignore:

That's it for today, but I'll be back soon with more.  Have a great one!

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Today marks the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, what is commonly referred to as the beginning of the modern LGBT equality movement and the reason that June is Pride month.  If you’re not familiar, here’s what happened:

People ask why we celebrate pride.  NoFo writes it much more eloquently than I ever could, here is an excerpt:

We’re proud because despite relentless persecution everywhere we turn—when organized religion viciously attacks and censures and vilifies us in the name of selective morality, when our families disown us, when our elected officials bargain away our equality for hate votes, when entire states codify our families into second-class citizenship, when our employers fire us, when our landlords evict us, when our police harass us, when our neighbors and colleagues and fellow citizens openly insult and condemn and mock and berate and even beat and kill us—we continue to survive.
...
We’re proud because—thanks to the incredible bravery shown by gay people who lived their lives openly in the decades before us—we can live our lives more and more openly at home, at work, with our families, on our blogs … and even on national television.
...
We’re proud because after all we’ve been through, the world is starting to notice and respect us and emulate the often fabulous culture we’ve assembled from the common struggles and glorious diversity of our disparate lives.

We’re proud because this weekend we’ll celebrate with drag queens, leather queens, muscle queens, attitude queens and you’d-never-know-they-were-queens queens, and together we can see through the “pride” in our parade and enjoy the underlying Pride in our parade.

Quite simply, we’re proud that we have so much to be proud of.

We can take some time, and even in the face of hatred, bigotry and discrimination, we can carve a place in this world, claim it our own and celebrate.

We can celebrate the community that we have, the radical acceptance that we embody and the fact that we’ve survived.  We have a chance to come together, remind ourselves we belong to a larger community, have some fun and take back our city; just for a little bit, even when it’s still dangerous to be perceived as gay, even in places like The Village:

This is my home. I’ve walked by that corner hundreds of times while holding Tony’s hand. And now, holding his hand again, I felt sick to my stomach. I felt sick because of the injustice. Because of the loss of life. Because my home had been violated. Because I thought we had moved beyond this. Because I felt vulnerable.

We know that hatred will continue, but still we march forward.  We have pride because it helps those coming after us.  In the words of Harvey Milk, it gives the next generation hope:

And this is a chance to celebrate the fact that I’ve survived.  A chance to celebrate the fact that I’m a proud gay man.  And even that act, powerful unto itself, has hopefully made a difference.

The most important and powerful action a person can make is to come out to those around them.  Then the LGBT community isn’t a scary abstract anymore, it has a face.  If you know someone who is openly LGBT, you see their humanity.  You can understand that we’re not asking for anything special, just the same rights everyone else is guaranteed by the constitution.  A chance to be happy.  A chance to live the life we want, surrounded by those we love.

When will we stop talking about coming out?

"Many of us want to, and will: when a gay, lesbian or transgendered kid isn’t at special risk of being brutalized or committing suicide.

"When a gay person’s central-casting earnestness and eloquence aren’t noted with excitement and relief, because his or her sexual orientation needn’t be accompanied by a litany of virtues and accomplishments in order for bigotry to be toppled and a negative reaction to be overcome."

We will stop talking about coming out when it’s not news anymore, when the last barriers have finally been broken down.  We’ll stop screaming for our rights when we’re finally treated as equals by our government.  We’ll only stop telling our stories when they don’t matter.

This is a bit heavy handed (the original that this parodies was also over the top), but Crew Magazine put this together, and it rings true:

So we keep fighting for progress, wherever we can.  We celebrate our advances and keep chipping away at our obstacles: and this month we can celebrate both, as well as the individuals that make up our amazing community.

We’re proud of how far we’ve come.  We’re proud to keep fighting.  We’re proud.

All my best,

Mike

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Ten years after Lawrence v. Texas, we have the rulings on Hollingsworth v. Perry and United States v. Windsor.

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Pride was this past weekend, and it was kind of perfect in so many ways, and pretty much exactly what I needed.  If you're interested in what my day was like, read below.  It's kind of long, and very much like an actual blog (I know, scary, right?).  If not, I won't be offended either, promise.

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Read more: Pittsburgh Pride 2013