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Alright, let's see what we have today.

First up, pay attention because this is really important.  Remember the anti-gay bakers that refused to bake a cake for a lesbian couple?  They got sued because of they harassed the couple, drug their name through the mud and released their contact information, leading to even more harassment and death threats.  They've been claiming that they're the real victims and have raised over $450,000 dollars (the fine was $135,000).  Likewise, a county clerk is Kentucky is refusing to do his job (by not issuing marriage certificates to same-sex couples).  The governor has personally talked to him to tell him to either resign or do his job.  But he's claiming religious freedom.  Now we just wait to see how much money he'll raise for himself once he gets fired.  The cycle just keeps repeating.

I've been on my soapbox for years about the role institutionalized discrimination plays in the epidemic of youth LGBT suicides, and a Methodist pastor, fired for being gay, says the same thing.

Awesome bookends featured by Nerdist:

Republican Senators killed a bill aimed at decreasing bullying in schools.  Because they hate the gays.

A judge in Texas will follow the law and marry gay couples, but they have to sign a document saying the understand how much he hates them first.

The sculpture featured in the end credits of "Avengers: Age of Ultron" was a physical prop!

Checking into the American Horror Story: Hotel:

Coke puts six men in a dark room so they can talk.  It's been done before, but it's still a cool concept.

XKCD takes on the images of Pluto, and it's an awesome map!

The real price of being gay and belonging to an evangelical church.  Long, but worth a read.

Now it turns out that evangelicals had a third condition for their pet gay celibates: They had to reject gay sex, gay relationships, and gay marriage not just for themselves but for all gays and lesbians.

It's been a great few weeks for LGBT rights, first marriage equality, then added protections for LGBT seniors, the final vestige of Don't Ask Don't Tell coming down by allowing transgender servicemembers, and now, what is probably the biggest victor, and set to help more people in very practical ways than even marriage: employment protections:

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination—a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers.... The independent commission addressed the question of whether the ban on sex discrimination in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 bars anti-LGB discrimination in a complaint brought by a Florida-based air traffic control specialist against Transportation Sec. Anthony Foxx. The ruling—approved by a 3-2 vote of the five-person commission—applies to federal employees’ claims directly, but it also applies to the entire EEOC, which includes its offices across the nation that take and investigate claims of discrimination in private employment.

Make no mistake, this will end up before the courts, but this is a huge deal, one that we've been fighting for for even longer than marriage and has failed in every single session of Congress.  This is huge.


Alright, let's see what we have today.  First up, this is the reel from Comic Con about Episode VII:

Earlier today I posted an article about my bishop.  Want to see some awesome drone footage of my church?  Of course you do!

The truth about the lawsuit against the anti-gay bakers in Oregon.  The payment is because they continuously harassed and then doxed the couple.  And in reality, refusing your service to a group of people is discrimination.  It is no different than a woman, African American or Irish American being denied to be served.  It's bigoted, and in Oregon, against the law.

The Pizza Hut box projector, genius!

My new favorite blog, Pittsburgh Cemeteries:

ESPN teamed up with Marvel to do a Superhero Body Issue!

A jury has found ex-gay "conversion therapy" to be guilty of fraud.  Awesome.

The smallest country in the world (population: 48) has marriage equality.  One small problem, there's no gay people.

Prepare to feel old: it's been 30 years since Clue (the movie) was released.

John Oliver takes on trans* issues.  Watch this:

And in the same vein, Google launched this ad:

Attention straight people, this is puppy play (also, I'm sure the picture accompanying this story is helping it's popularity).  This will take the straight world by storm in a few years.  Also, appropriate since Anthrocon is in town (but they're different!)

The Girl Scouts returned a donation of $100,000 after the donor specified it not go towards any trans* girls.  They then got twice as much donated from the internet.

AirBnB has a great new ad about travel issues and Pride month.  But it's a great examination of straight privilege:

Remember that time Republicans in Colorado voted to increase the number of abortions?  Remember, they're not anti-abortion, they're anti-sex.

Brian Sims rides a shark.  Because of course he does:

Some awesome ways to get around Australia's strangely-draconian marriage laws.

It's kind of a joke, but this is an awesome meditation (not safe for work):

That's it for now, have a great one!


Two weeks ago SCOTUS made marriage equality the law of the land, ushering in the age of same-sex marriage.

Quickly following, was the Episcopal Church's General Convention.  The GC is the decision making body of the Church, meeting every three years in two chambers, the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies (and this year the unofficial House of Twitter).  The two houses spent nine days working through resolutions, which included electing a new Presiding Bishop, divesting in fossil fuels and even raising all church worker's pay to $15/hour (this already on top of women bishops and conga lines.  Seriously, we're a progressive church).  This is where the actual Canons of the church are changed, as well as countless proclamations and other resolutions and studies.

The biggest news was that both houses passed the use of a previously-tested Rite and the update to the marriage rite for same-sex couples.  The Canons of the church were updated to make marriage the union of two people, regardless of gender.

So it's awesome, I actually wasn't aware they were going to update the "regular" marriage rite (I did follow along on Twitter, but I didn't read the Blue Book ahead of time with all the resolutions).

My bishop, of course, voted against the resolution.  He did not, join a letter that 20 bishops signed on to expressing disappointment in the outcome, so I suppose that is some restraint.  He has not been a friend to the queer community, so this was expected.  It's just disappointing.  In a pastoral letter to the diocese he wrote:

However, to my mind, their supporting materials do not make a coherent or compelling theological case for same-sex marriage, nor do the rites themselves adequately explain what they are doing and why. Especially in the wake of the recent Supreme Court decision, their approval was seen by the overwhelming majority of those present at Convention as a matter of"marriage equality," of simple justice, making irrelevant any serious discussion of sacramental theology.

My church will be performing any marriage, so it's not an issue, but his letter reeks of pettiness.  Almost as if he wants to throw out the idea that the queer community should be seen as equal in the eyes of the church.  I don't understand his vehemence against us, or continued insistence that the church is moving in the wrong direction by granting all its members equal access to the sacraments.

I wrote about this extensively at Global Entropy, although I still need to bring those couple articles over.

But I'm tired of fighting.  Yes, we won this battle (and there are many more to go), but this was a major victory.  And sometimes, I just need a break and want to enjoy what we've accomplished.  The country is not perfect, but we're moving closer to being a 'more perfect union.'

In the meantime, I'll actively avoid church whenever the Bishop visits (I already do, although he was at the Easter service I went to), I don't want to deal with a cleric who doesn't see me as worthy as other parishioners.

I spent this morning working with the Young Adult Ministry (YAM) from my church on a Habitat for Humanity house.  I wasn't seen as unequal or broken, the same with any other time I'm with them, including our last happy hour where every person around the table was some sort of minority.  The bishop can have his outdated and harmful views, and I'll fight and rail against them, but for now, I'm going to take satisfaction in a job well done.

All my best,

Mike

h/t to Scott, the rector of St. Brendan's for the awesome illustration!


Today marks the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which launched the LGBT-rights movement.

If you’re not familiar with the riots, here’s what happened:

People ask why we celebrate pride.  NoFo writes it much more eloquently than I ever could, here is an excerpt:

We’re proud because despite relentless persecution everywhere we turn—when organized religion viciously attacks and censures and vilifies us in the name of selective morality, when our families disown us, when our elected officials bargain away our equality for hate votes, when entire states codify our families into second-class citizenship, when our employers fire us, when our landlords evict us, when our police harass us, when our neighbors and colleagues and fellow citizens openly insult and condemn and mock and berate and even beat and kill us—we continue to survive.
...
We’re proud because—thanks to the incredible bravery shown by gay people who lived their lives openly in the decades before us—we can live our lives more and more openly at home, at work, with our families, on our blogs … and even on national television.
...
We’re proud because after all we’ve been through, the world is starting to notice and respect us and emulate the often fabulous culture we’ve assembled from the common struggles and glorious diversity of our disparate lives.

We’re proud because this weekend we’ll celebrate with drag queens, leather queens, muscle queens, attitude queens and you’d-never-know-they-were-queens queens, and together we can see through the “pride” in our parade and enjoy the underlying Pride in our parade.

Quite simply, we’re proud that we have so much to be proud of.

We can take some time, and even in the face of hatred, bigotry and discrimination, we can carve a place in this world, claim it our own and celebrate.

We can celebrate, because this is our party.  We don't need anyone's permission to celebrate:

Because even if Pride doesn't change many minds in the outside world, it's our PARTY, darlings. It's our Christmas, our New Year's, our Carnival. It's the one day of the year that all the crazy contingents of the gay world actually come face to face on the street and blow each other air kisses. And wish each other "Happy Pride!" Saying "Happy Pride!" is really just a shorter, easier way of saying "Congratulations on not being driven completely batshit insane! Well done, being YOURSELF!"

We can celebrate the community that we have, the radical acceptance that we embody and the fact that we’ve survived.  We have a chance to come together, remind ourselves we belong to a larger community, have some fun and take back our city; just for a little bit.  We know that hatred will continue, but still we march forward.  We have pride because it helps those coming after us.  In the words of Harvey Milk, it gives the next generation hope:

And this is a chance to celebrate the fact that I’ve survived.  A chance to celebrate the fact that I’m a proud gay man.  And even that act, powerful unto itself, has hopefully made a difference.

The most important and powerful action a person can make is to come out to those around them.  Then the LGBT community isn’t a scary abstract anymore, it has a face.  If you know someone who is openly LGBT, you see their humanity.  You can understand that we’re not asking for anything special, just the same rights everyone else is guaranteed by the constitution.  A chance to be happy.  A chance to live the life we want, surrounded by those we love.

When will we stop talking about coming out?

"Many of us want to, and will: when a gay, lesbian or transgendered kid isn’t at special risk of being brutalized or committing suicide.

"When a gay person’s central-casting earnestness and eloquence aren’t noted with excitement and relief, because his or her sexual orientation needn’t be accompanied by a litany of virtues and accomplishments in order for bigotry to be toppled and a negative reaction to be overcome."

We will stop talking about coming out when it’s not news anymore, when the last barriers have finally been broken down.  We’ll stop screaming for our rights when we’re finally treated as equals by our government.  We’ll only stop telling our stories when they don’t matter.

The anniversary of Stonewall comes just two days after marriage equality came to all 50 states (and the anniversary of decisions in Lawrence v. Texas and Windsor v. United States), a major piece of the equality dream the drag queens, homeless youth and the rest of Stonewall protesters had less than 50 years ago.  In 11 years, we've gone from no marriage rights to full equality across the country.  We still have a lot to fight for, ENDA being at the top of that list, but for now, we can celebrate the 'thunderbolt' of equality that we have achieved:

So we keep fighting for progress, wherever we can.  We celebrate our advances and keep chipping away at our obstacles: and this month we can celebrate both, as well as the individuals that make up our amazing community.

We’re proud of how far we’ve come.  We’re proud to keep fighting.  We’re proud.


It’s Pittsburgh Pride, and the shit is hitting the fan.

Note, I wrote the majority of this in the days leading up to Pride.

First, some background.  We start with the Lambda Foundation.  Years ago, they were the LGBT organization in Pittsburgh.  Delta was a spin-off of Lambda and did the event planning.  Over the years, Delta became the prominent organization.  A couple years ago, what was left of Lambda was absorbed by Delta under the name “Lambda Giving,” with their goal to facilitate charitable giving (with a separate board).

 

Delta is headed by Gary Van Horn (side note, I graduated high school with his younger brother, and he’s a decent guy), and years ago he was in a bunch of legal/criminal trouble.  To anyone outside of Monroeville, this old news gets dredged up as news whenever there is a controversy around Delta, we just shrug my shoulders: we all knew Gary had some trouble in his past and just sort of expect these kind of shenanigans.  There’s more than what’s been reported, and the more I talk with my friends, the creepier interactions I keep hearing about, but suffice to say Van Horn isn’t someone you really want to hang out with, let alone be in charge of such a large organization.

 

To Delta’s credit however, I feel bad because no matter why they book to headline Pride, there is no way they’ll ever please everyone.  Last year when it was Chaka Kahn, there were a ton of people complaining it wasn’t someone more relevant.  After Adam Lambert performed, there were complaints his set was way too short.  When planning a big event, you’re never going to please everyone, that’s just how the world works sadly, and those who are disappointed by some aspect will be vocal.

 

Which brings us to this year’s headliner: Iggy Azalea.  Personally, I think her music is horrible, but she’s “relevant” (more on that in a moment).  However, in her past, Azalea has a history of homophobic and racist comments, particularly on social media.  Which again, things don’t go away on the Internet, they’re there forever.

 

I can almost give her a pass on her homophobic comments, she actually did have what seemed to be a very heartfelt and sincere apology, and I like to believe that people have changed.  But her entire career, her entire persona, is based on the appropriation of a southern, African-American rapper.

 

She’s a white girl from the suburbs of Sydney, Australia.

 

She hasn’t apologized for her racist remarks, and tries to make a living through stealing a culture that she hasn’t lived and that comes off as offensive.  She eventually backed out, in the wake of cancelling her entire tour, she cancelled her appearance at Pride, being replaced by Nick Jonas. Azalea has now gone on to say people are only hating her because "it's cool."

 

The booking of Azalea sparked off a cavalcade of criticism of the Delta Foundation, many of which had been brought up before, but were now all adding up to create a bigger picture of the organization. Bruce Kraus, the first and only openly LGBT member of Pittsburgh City Council (and its president), as well as GLSEN and many faith orgnaizations, pulled out of Pride, not only because of Azalea, but also the direction that Delta has been going for years.

 

They are inherently dedicated to cis-gendered, wealthy, white gay men.  The board has no trans* members, and only two women.  Pride in the Street is routinely an expensive concert to go to, especially for a community that is economically disadvantaged to begin with.

 

Their magazine, Equal, was finally shut down after months of not paying their writers or their printer.

 

One service they did offer, was small fundraising/banking services to smaller LGBT groups, such as the Gardens of Peace project (much like when banks will be donation locations for non-profits/emergency assistance funds, the Delta Foundation would do the same for other projects), except when they needed to get their money, they got the runaround or were charged interest on it.

 

This is an organization that last year, during Pride in the Street, shut down the public sidewalks, so unless you had a ticket, you could not get to the business and restaurants that were on the streets that were closed to traffic.  This unannounced change led to a lot of people turned away from other events they had tickets to, or were forced to pay an additional fee to get to them.

 

But I what I think is the most damning of all, is that in the last seven years, the Delta Foundation has given less back to the community than what they contracted Iggy Azalea to play for.

 

Delta Foundation used to bill itself as the largest LGBT organization in Western Pennsylvania.  That language has softened this week to describe themselves as “one of the largest,” finally making room for others, which is a nice change.

 

As such, they have failed to encompass the LGBT community in Pittsburgh.  I don’t expect them to be perfect, no organization is.  But these are criticisms that have been ongoing for years.  And they had the balls to post on Facebook that this was the first they had ever heard of them, after hosting a meeting to try to address some of these issues:

 

 

That’s either entirely disingenuous or proof that their entire board has no clue what they are doing.  Or maybe both.

 

But I think part of the reason we’re at this point is there is less work to do in Pittsburgh than other areas.  Pennsylvania has marriage equality, and Allegheny County has ENDA.  Yes, there is a lot of work to be done, especially in the rest of the counties that constitute Western Pennsylvania, but so much of the other goals we need to fight for are at a state and national level, beyond the scope of Delta (not that they couldn't help EqualityPA however).

 

So for now, Delta serves as a glorified party planner.  Van Horn won’t step down (why would he, it’s a cushy job, and he still owns a bar I believe), and I’m afraid not much will change at Delta.  But for the first time, there were Latin Pride events held in Pittsburgh (not that we’re known for our Hispanic population, but it’s more than I imagined, sitting around two percent), and what was formerly Black Pride, now Roots Pride, seems to be really taking off, both as a protest to Delta and as a fully inclusive and minority-oriented series of Pride events.

 

I don’t necessarily think splitting apart is the way to go, but at least right now, here in Pittsburgh, it seems to be the only way to get things done.  And if this forces Delta to actually make systemic changes and listen to the greater queer population in Pittsburgh, so be it.

 

I hope we can all reconcile and reconnect, and maybe that will even happen for 2016 Pride, we'll have to see where this conversation goes, and we have to hold Delta accountable to keep having the conversation and to actually listen.

 

This however, is not just a problem that plagues Pittsburgh: this is a national problem. The HRC was recently described as a "White Man's Club," and it has every appearance as such, and a recent UK poll of gay men shows a shocking rate of racism.

 

This is something that lots of us, myself included, want to make better (and are probably guilty of ourselves).  We can't just sit on the sidelines and allow this to be our community.  Especially when there are so many external forces at work.

 

Which brings us to the second part of this sad article, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

 

For those unfamiliar, there are two daily papers in Pittsburgh (not counting the Business Times), the PG is larger by itself and leans liberal, the Trib (which has better coverage of Westmoreland County and owns the weekly neighborhood papers), leans conservative.

 

However, the PG published an utterly shocking, bigoted and harmful article in their editorial section about Caitlyn Jenner recently.  I won't repost it, it's that's bad, not only from a hate standpoint, but just flat out lies.

 

The City Paper has an excellent take down:

 

In case you didn’t catch it, yes, Graham used references to the “good ol' days” of carnival freak shows to refer to Ms. Jenner, or as Graham so sensitively calls her: “Brucette.” Brucette?!? Really? Why not just call her “fruity,” “fairy,” “queer” or “fag?” I’ll tell you why. Because you know those words are hateful, disgusting and inappropriate. So you try and be cute and clever with "Brucette." Guess what? It’s just as disgusting, maybe more so.

 

And what is most shocking, is, as City Paper notes, the PG was recently awarded a GLAAD award and had a great speical feature covering the lives and stories of six trans* individuals here in the city.

 

The PG has defended the article, the Editoral Page Editor responded:

 

As an editor, I found Jennifer's piece well-written and worth publishing.

 

The HRC (yes the one above I just called out for being a white man's club) did their job and also had a fantastic rebuttal to the horrific article.

 

Consider the facts:
• 20 percent of transgender people have lost a job simply on the basis of their identity;
• 50 percent have been harassed on the job;
• Transgender people are four times more likely to live in extreme poverty;
• And so far, at least 8 transgender women of color have been murdered across the country in 2015.

Another rebuttal did get printed in the PG itself:

By Ms. Graham’s logic, I’d be forced to use a women’s bathroom — despite being a short, bald man who, if I’m being honest, looks like a slightly more svelte version of George Costanza.

 

Whatever Caitlyn Jenner decides to do with her life (yes, HER life) will little affect Ms. Graham. You know, every major professional organization — from the American Medical Association to the American Academy of Pediatrics to the American Psychiatric Association — believes not only that I and Caitlyn Jenner and our likely 1 million or more fellow transgender Americans exist, but also that we should be supported by the medical community. And there’s widespread support for laws that protect transgender people from discrimination.

 

Pride is a celebration.  We remember the Stonewall Riots and everyone who came before us.  We remember those who have fought for our very right to exist.  To love.  To be free.  Pride is a time when all the beautiful facets of the queer community (and our allies) can rally together, enjoy a celebration, take stock, and see what our next move is.

 

Pride is always inclusive.  Even when the organizations that run the events and parts of the greater community turn their backs on us.  We will continue to fight, to make the world a better place.

 

Not just for ourselves, but for those coming after us.

 

I still marched in the Pride Parade (I'll probably have a post about my Pride experience later this week).  Yes there was drama, both internal and external, but Pride belongs to the community.  Not to a non-profit, and certainly not to those who would make us believe we're somehow broken.

 

Wherever you are, I hope you celebrate(d) Pride, and I hope you'll join the queer community and our allies at Decision Day Rallies when the Supreme Court announces their decision sometime in the next two weeks.

 

But most of all, I hope you can celebrate Pride in your own way.  Safe, and with the knowledge that you're worth it, and part of the greater community.


Alright, quick update, let's see what we have today.

They wish we were invisible.  We're not.  Let's dance.  Joe My God's annual Pride post, worth the read.

Speaking of Pride, here's Target's video they released for Pride this year, really awesome and includes a clip from a great wedding video I love:

Shark killed in traffic accident.  Sad, but true.

Men who have sex with men are still barred from donating blood.  To protest this, an artist has created "Blood Mirror" a tank filled with the blood of gay and bi men:

Philea, the lander on the comet 67P, has woken up!

Alan Rickman and helium!

Mapping where in Africa it's illegal to be gay.

The evolution of Disney:

An economics professor explains how the Empire built the Death Star.  And, how many batteries would it take to run the Death Star?  Spoiler: A lot.

Wall-E is going to be a Lego set!  Adorable!

And finally, couples ask each other's questions in truth or drink:

That's it for now, but I'll be back soon, have a great one!


Let's see what we have today.  First up, proof that we're living in the future: a knife that toasts bread as it slices!

Arrested Development is coming back for a fifth season!

Republicans in Congress have stopped benefits for veterans.  Well, just the gay ones living in states without marriage equality.

Quite possibly the greatest mash-up of all time, Kimmy Schmidt and Orange is the New Black:

A look at "Midnighter" the relaunched superhero from DC.  I read the first issue and loved it, although the article gets one thing wrong, the app he's on is Scruff, not Grindr.

Jason Collins calls out Tony Dungy on his homophobia, and it's perfect.

THere's now a new X-Wing drone.  Awesome!

Derrick Gordon, a gay basketball player, is transferring to play for Seton Hall, and it's a big deal.

Maybe people honestly don't know this.  But gay men can look at each other when they have sex.  Now you know.

From before the Irish marriage vote, what would happen if we lost:

Laramie, Wyoming, home of Matthew Shepherd, finally passes LGBT protections.

Overall, the number of hate groups fell 17% last year.  But the number of anti-LGBT hate groups increased 10%.

I have to admit, I thought this had already passed.  The FDA is now proposing that men who have sex with men (their language), can donate blood if they abstain for a year.

And to everyone saying what Caitlyn Jenner did didn't take courage, read this post about a viral Facebook post dealing with the same.  Neither form of bravery is mutually exclusive, and hate helps no one:

That's it for now, have a great one!


Quick post, but some good stuff.  First up, with June starting tomorrow, it's Pride month.  Here's Dan Savage's guide to straight people enjoying pride festivals:

I think the message in Pride for straight people–and why I think straight people should go–is that there should be more than one way to be a straight person too. That there is a script written for straight people about how you’re supposed to live your life and who you’re supposed to be and that script is confining and stultifying and restricting and straight people to need to break out of that. I think what a lot of straight people leave with is ‘Wow, there’s so many ways to be queer maybe I can conceive of perhaps a different way to be straight.’

A bunch of friends built mini-houses all together, creating "Bestie Row"

Something I've always wondered, why are there so many Penn Stations?  Which, coincidentally, was on my bus stop when I took it downtown!

I saw this going around those close to me in age, and it sums us up perfectly: The Oregon Trail generation.  Not Gen X'ers, not Millenials.  Somewhere lost in between.

And finally, we celebrated Harvey Milk Day by volunteering here in Pittsburgh.  To commemorate, one of my favorite quotes:


Quick update today, more to come later.  Also, I'm not sure what's going on with the videos, I'm looking into it, hopefully I can get the embedded youtube to work again soon!

First up, Jurrasic World is doing a promotion with Barbasol Shaving Cream, which is awesome!

Get ready for all the feels, here's the trailer for "Batkid Begins"

Soooooo, Earth has a Death Star.  The ISS might be getting a laser to destroy Alderaan space junk.

Magnum's (the ice cream bar, not the condom) new ad features drag queens and other gender-nonconforming members of society, and it's awesome.  Points for having Willam in there!

The actor who played Neville Longbottom is the Harry Potter movies has grown up into a hunk.  Seriously.  And his twitter exchange with J.K. Rowling is hilarious!

 A waste of life anti-gay pastor is...surprise!  Actually gay himself!  He's a top and loves to cuddle, by the way.  But why the extra vitriol?  Because in a counseling session, he told a teenage boy struggling with his own gay identity that he should kill himself.  Normally, I don't think anyone should be outed, we should all be able to come out on our own terms, but when an anti-gay person uses their power to take away the rights of their own community, they deserve the full wrath of the mob.  And this guy in particular with the whole suicide thing.

This:

See also: The Catholic Church

And in awkwardly ironic news, that time Jim Bob Duggar, when running for office, after his son had already confessed molesting his sisters, called for the death penalty for those who commit incest.  I guess those who rally against things that hard really are hiding something.  But all in all, my heart breaks for the victims and I hope they can get some actual counselling, not whatever psycho bullshit their parents are giving them.

Sorry to end on such a down note, but I"ll be back with more soon, have a great one!


Quick update, but I'll be back with something more substantial very soon.  But first up, here's all the new TV that I'm excited about.  First up, The Muppets:

Next up, it's not coming out until 2016, but SyFy's The Magicians looks amazing (although I don't like how Brakebills looks, but otherwise, I'm very impressed):

And lastly, the sitcom based on Dan Savage's life: The Real O'Neil's.  Honestly, it looks like it could go either way, but I"m going to give it the benefit of the doubt and hope that it turns out well.

Speaking of Dan Savage, here's a great piece about his idea of the "sexual hierarchy:" What/who you think about/want to do, what/who you do, what/who you tell people you do.  The more in concert those three are with each other, the happier and more comfortable you are with your sexuality.

The Good Men Project calls the GOP out on their hypocrisy.

Ireland made history yesterday by voting, in a public referendum, to amend their constitution to bring marriage equality by a 2-1 margin!  And if you want to have some faith in humanity restored, this article describes #HomeToVote: Ireland does not have absentee ballots, so Irish ex-pats flew from around the world to vote Yes on the marriage question.  Congrats to Ireland, hopefully the US joins you in June!